Wild Weed Wisdom

Nurture Your 'Inner Wild' with Foraged Edible and Medicinal Plants


5 Comments

Prickly Sow Thistle

Prickly Sow ThistlePrickly Sow Thistle (Sonchus asper) is another edible plant that grows as a weed in disturbed soil or neglected places. I picked some the other day to add to my daily “Super-Local Food” intake! Nothing fancy here – you can cook it up with garlic, olive oil, herbs, or chop it up to add for soups… use it as you would spinach, like we do with most wild greens. It looks prickly, but the ‘prickles’ are actually quite tender, and when cooked they’re fine. Today I’m adding Prickly Sow Thistle to a ‘green juice’ along with wheatgrass and ginger.

Mainly, I want to give you a good photo for identifying this plant. Notice  how the buds look remarkably similar to dandelion buds – you could make pickles out of either of them – but the Sonchus asprer has prickles even on the buds!! They will soften if you blanch then before pickling. The flower in full-bloom also looks similar to dandelions golden-yellow face – I’ll go back for a photo soon to show you. The leaf-edges are wavy, very decorative in their own way, and the base claps the stem in a graceful arc, with the leaf half-surrounding the stem in a big hug. So, for all the prickles, I still see it as a gentle, loving plant.

Here are a couple more photos to get a good idea of the plant. The large, ridged stem is a bit blotched with red, and it’s hollow, like a straw, with milky sap, much like the dandelion in this way.

Wikipedia lists this as a noxious weed that can cause irritation, but I think they are being cautious. You can find many other sites that consider this plant to be safe. I ate it and loved it. Here is another site that feels the same way: http://www.eattheweeds.com/sonchus-sow-thistle-in-a-pigs-eye-2/

DSC07094 DSC07095 Sow thistle back side of leaf

 

Advertisements

Violets and Celandine

3 Comments

Violets and Celandine

Sometimes I don’t have my paper bags with me for harvesting, so I just use whatever is available. Today it was my daughter’s lunch box. I picked Greater Celendine, which I made into an herbal tincture, and about 10 violets. We have company staying with us, so nothing nicer than to introduce them to food-foraging with a dessert of wild violets on ice cream!
You can get a really good look at the leaf of the Greater Celandine – front, and back-side, which you can see is quite a bit lighter in colour.


3 Comments

Catfish Gray, Man of the Woods (1917-2002)

Catfish Gray (1917-2002) was the teacher, and friend, of my own herbal mentor, Will Endres. Will spent a year living out of a tent in the woods, without running water or electricity, to be close to Catfish and learn from his extensive knowledge. This led to a 28-year relationship, until Catfish’s passing in 2002. I feel honoured to now be a small part in this lineage of herbalists and wildcrafters. Thank you Catfish Gray, thank you, Will Endres.

Image

Catfish Gray, lengendary Man of the Woods

You can find a few articles about Catfish online – here’s the one with the amazing photo – and here’s a film clip from 1974…